One beautiful thing about photography is that we are always trying to replicate an image captured by our eyes. But since lenses don't have peripheral vision, we are stuck with attempting to capsulate the image with a background and/or lighting that will tell the story of why we were attracted to it from the beginning. Sometimes the techniques we use to achieve that end result can range between purchasing equipment dedicated to a certain effect (i.e.- filters, lens babies, softwares, etc.) or it can come from lying awake at night contemplating the properties of a jar of vaseline, the vantage point from a 10 foot ladder, or any other idea that will take a simple photo to the next level. Wedding photographers do it more than they'd like to admit.

For instance, one technique I like is having the subject's attire match a flat background (usually black or white) as close as possible. It's very basic. By adjusting the highlights and shadows, the viewer's eyes have no choice but to focus their attention on the uncovered extremities of the subject; nothing else. Go ahead, get fancy and tilt the camera a few degrees left or right and place the subject off the center of the frame. Fill the frame as much as possible by zooming in on the uncovered areas (head/hands/feet) as much as possible (make sure both eyes are included). Sure it's kind of elementary, but it tends to add a bit of exoticness to the theme of the photo. Also It's one of the least expensive techniques to do and it forces the photographer to be a little more selective in his/her choice of subjects. Just don't use it too often or you'll become a "one trick pony".

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My How things have changed. especially in the photo world. Where as you used to need to really study your craft to be considered a good photographer. You needed to know about lighting, F stops, shutter speeds, etc. and those who mastered these and the other intrinsic qualities and were able to bend the rules to get a desired effect, became wealthy, or at least tried to be. Certain skill in the darkroom also assured the talented practitioner recognition. Now with actual film being hardly used anymore and digital being the present and future of photography developing a technique in this newest of mediums is paramount. Today with the ability to take a picture with everything from a Cellphone, to cigarette lighter, the buzz words to know is mega pixels, and how many does your device have. I do believe that no matter whether old school or new, The gift of composition, and a talented eye will take you far.
Amen to that Wayne, after all you have to SEE it to shot it.

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