SPOTLIGHTED ARTISTS AND BUSINESSES:


SYNCHRONICITY
COLIN WHITBY

KEN GREVES "VINTAGE & RARE: THE SONGS OF HAROLD ARLEN VOLUME TWO 

dEE BROWN
REMEMBERING YOU

Photos

  • Add Photos
  • View All

 

Jaijai, what a wonderful mission you've undertaken to create such a place for artistic minds to meet and share their hearts. A place to renew faded determinations, and revive lessened momentums. A place to display our wares and reconfirm to one another that we actually are on the right track.

I commend you, Jaijai, for caring so much that you created this castle of the heart for all of us. I want to share my praise for all of the new friends as well as old friends that I've met and will meet here in our castle. Here we can garnish the where-with-all, the strength, the conviction, and the selflessness through our symbiosis, to share our gift to the world with an unbiased agenda.

My mentor, Daisaku Ikeda says of art: "A beautiful flower delights and refreshes the hearts of all people equally, no matter what soil it grows in. That is the power of beauty. The same is true of great art. It is this spirit that the German poet Heinrich Heine sang of when he wrote that once the peapod bursts open, the sugar peas inside are for everyone to enjoy."

Let's be audacious, my friends!

Buster Williams

RSS

Kamasi Washington's Heaven Exists In His Mind

The jazz torchbearer's new record 'Heaven and Earth' represents the relationship between his inner world and outward reality.

New Music Friday For June 22: Six Albums You Should Hear Now

Highlights from June 22 include the intense industrial rock of Nine Inch Nails, the new joint project of Lecrae & Zaytoven and the wildly ambitious, shape-shifting jazz of Kamasi Washington.

First Listen: Charles Lloyd & The Marvels + Lucinda Williams, 'Vanished Gardens'

The veteran jazz master teams up with one of America's most cherished songwriters.

Lorraine Gordon, Guardian Of Legendary Jazz Club, Dies At 95

The owner of the revered Village Vanguard in New York City — and a champion of generations of jazz musicians, including Thelonious Monk — died Saturday at age 95.

At The Helm: Harold Mabern, Stalwart Accompanist, At 82

Harold Mabern has been one of jazz's most consistent accompanists over the last 60 years. In this episode of Jazz Night in America, we explore some of that history with him.

Click the image to give us your ideas for great festivals, events, fundraisers, sponsors, investors, etc. Let's combine our databases to bring us all to the next level of networking!

The Jazz Network reserves the right to approve, decline, ban or suspend membership at anytime without notice at its own discretion.

THE JAZZ NETWORK WORLDWIDE IS AN ORIGINAL ENTITY AND SOLE PROPRIETOR AND HAS NEVER PARTNERED OR AFFILIATED ITSELF WITH ANY OTHER JAZZ NETWORK THAT EXISTS THAT HAS A SIMILAR INTERFACE TO OUR ORIGINAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTIES, LAYOUT, ADVERTISEMENTS AND GRAPHIC DESIGN.

Belgium 1966

Views: 140

Comment

You need to be a member of THE JAZZ NETWORK WORLDWIDE "A GREAT PLACE TO HANG" to add comments!

Join THE JAZZ NETWORK WORLDWIDE "A GREAT PLACE TO HANG"

Comment by Kenny Clarke on May 3, 2008 at 11:01am
I wish i could play half that well he has been a huge inspiration ever since my dad played his record concert by the sea when i was about 9 ys old now in my 40's it's fun trying! what a great video!Thank You!
Kenny
Comment by RON B on January 19, 2008 at 9:22pm
Wow...Thank you for that video...Errol Garner was my intro into the Jazz world . A friend played his Concert By The Sea album for me when I was about 15 years old and I was hooked...I could not get enough of Jazz from that time forward.
Comment by Esquizito on January 19, 2008 at 1:48pm
Man! Did that put a smile on my face!

I'm waist-deep in an audio archiving project involving the great singer/guitarist/banjoist/historian/author, Danny Barker. Danny says that he first heard Garner in Pittsburgh, while touring with Cab in the late 30's/40's, and was blown away. He claims that Garner wasn't so sure that he could make it New York... Mr. Barker was quick to encourage him. Thank You Mr. Barker.

His centennial comes up in 2009. We like our centennials down here, and we love and revere Daniel Moses Barker.

Peace,
E.

by Ted Gottsegen
Guitarist and banjoist Danny Barker, a nephew of drummer Paul Barbarin, discovered his interest in music at an early age and was soon taking clarinet lessons from Barney Bigard. Because of his uncle, Danny was often found cutting school and following many bands around town witnessing some of the finest New Orleans had to offer including bands led by Buddy Bolden and Bunk Johnson, the Imperial, the Eagle Band and the Superior. This led to his first gig playing banjo subbing for an intoxicated Babe Son in Kid Rena's band. After this surprising debut, Barker began taking banjo lessons from George Augustin of the Imperial band, and came under the direct influence of Lorenzo Stall, Buddy Bolden's banjoist. It was not long before he dubbed "Banjo King of New Orleans".

In 1930 Barker moved north to New York City where he switched from banjo to guitar and in 1938 joined Benny Carter's Big Band and from 1939 to 1949 was the rhythm guitarist for Cab Calloway. In 1947 he took a job as guitarist for the "Jazz on the River" weekend cruises up and down the Hudson river where he played with fellow New Orleanians Albert Nicholas, Pops Foster, Baby Dodds, pianist James P. Johnson and cornetist Wild Bill Davison. Barker then worked as a freelance rhythm man around New York playing and recording with Sidney Bechet and Mezz Mezzrow, Bunk Johnson, Edmond Hall and Henry "Red" Allen.

By 1965, Barker, back in New Orleans, had married singer Blue Lu Barker. He split his time between performing with his wife and the Fairview Baptist Church Christian Band which he founded, lecturing on traditional jazz and working as Assistant to the Curator of the New Orleans Jazz museum up until his death in 1994.

© 2018   Created by Jaijai Jackson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

googled77eeec400d24e5e.html